My beloved wife, Pam

I am saddened and grief stricken over the loss of my best friend, companion and wife. She passed away suddenly without pain on August 19, 2013. According to initial predictions from my physicians, they felt that she would outlive me by many years. Ironically, I have been doing extremely well and am working part-time as a non-physician.

I will forever cherish our years together. We were able to experience many years together and shared experiences. I will remember those good times.

Thanks to everyone for your prayers and thoughts for both my son and for me.

Warmly,

David

Exercise Program for Dementia

Exercise may benefit the Alzheimer’s patient by improving both symptoms and quality of life. For the same level of brain deterioration, physically active people exhibit higher levels of cognitive functioning than sedentary people. It is thought that physically active people have a ‘cognitive reserve’ that is used when other areas of the brain are damaged.

An exercise routine may decrease the severity of symptoms of dementia as well as lead to increased mobility and independence. An exercise routine for the elderly should be composed of four components:

  1. Aerobic exercise
  2. Strength training
  3. Balance training
  4. Flexibility exercises

All training programs should be entered into gradually and only after checking with his/her physician.

An aerobic training program, improves cardiovascular health as well as brain health. It is associated with decreased risk of stroke and the related dementia. Physical activity may also decrease the beta-amyloid proteins leading to decreased amyloid plaque and decreased disruption between neurons. For maximum health benefit, 30-minutes of aerobic activity should be performed most days of the week. This need not be intense and the participant should be able to talk throughout. The 30-minutes can be split into smaller, 10-minutes segments if that is more desirable. When beginning a training program, you can start with intervals as short as 5-minutes and progress.

Strength training programs combat the loss of muscle mass associated with aging. It can improve independence, mobility, and balance. Daily tasks (e.g. getting out of bed, getting out of chairs, climbing stairs) become easier with increased strength. Ideally, 10-15 repetitions of 8-10 exercises should be performed 2 or 3 times per week. The resistance should be great enough that each set of repetitions is difficult to complete. Resistance may be applied with bands or tubing, light weights, or even cans of food. If the sets are completed easily, the resistance should be increased.

Balance exercises can be performed almost anywhere. Balance is position specific so both standing balance and sitting balance should be targeted. With improved standing balance, there is decreased risk of falls and fractures. Standing on one-leg, with or without assistance, will help improve standing balance. Sitting balance can be improved by sitting on a chair, couch, or balance ball, with the lower back straight, and lifting an arm or a leg into a different position. Also, chair stands can be included. The more unstable the sitting surface is, the more difficult the exercise will be. More advanced exercises such as backwards walking and leaning can be gradually added into the program.

Flexibility exercises are best performed with the aid of a personal trainer, training partner, or care giver. Flexibility exercises can improve back pain and shoulder pain and increase range of motion.

There are certainly challenges in starting and keeping a patient in an exercise program. However, older adults are among the most willing to begin exercise programs as they are more aware of health issues. With dementia patients, there may be additional challenges as the disease progresses. However, there are many techniques that may help combat challenges that arise. The improvement in functioning and quality of life should make the challenges worthwhile.

Published research related to this topic:
American College of Sports Medicine Position Stand. Exercise and Physical Activity for Older Adults.
Mazzeo, R., Cavanaugh, P., Evans, W. et al.
Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 1998: 30(6): 992-1008.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=9624662&query_hl=25

Exercise and activity level in Alzheimer’s disease : A potential treatment focus.
Teri L., McCurry, S., Buchner, D., et al. J.
Rehab. Research and Development. 1998: 35(4): 411-419
http://www.vard.org/jour/98/35/4/teri.pdf

 

Hearing Loss Linked to Cognitive Decline, Impairment

Medscape News
Jan 23, 2013

written by Pauline Anderson

Older adults with hearing loss have a rate of cognitive decline that is up to 40% faster than the rate in those with normal hearing, according to results of a new study. Those with hearing loss also appear to have a greater risk for cognitive impairment.

“I would argue going forward for next 30 or 40 years that from a public health perspective, there’s nothing more important than cognitive decline and dementia as the population ages,” said lead author Frank R. Lin, MD, PhD, assistant professor, otolaryngology, geriatrics, and epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

“So from a big picture point of view, identifying factors that are associated with cognitive decline and dementia are important, in particular those factors that are potentially modifiable.”

Although the study did not find a significant association between hearing aid use and rate of cognitive decline, Dr. Lin is convinced that addressing hearing loss could have an impact greater than just improving quality of life.

The study was published online January 21 in JAMA Internal Medicine, formerly known as Archives of Internal Medicine.

Help protect yourself and Medicare from fraud and identity theft

Report Fraud

To help protect yourself and Medicare from fraud and identity theft you should report it.Whenever you get a payment notice from Medicare review it for errors. The notice shows what Medicare was billed for, what Medicare paid, and what (if anything) you owe. Make sure Medicare was not billed for health care services, medical supplies, or equipment you did not get.

Before you contact your health care provider, Medicare, or the Inspector General’s hotline, carefully review the facts, and have the following ready:

  • The provider’s name and any identifying number you may have.
  • The service or item information you are questioning.
  • The date the service or item was supposedly given or delivered.
  • The payment amount approved and paid by Medicare.
  • The date on your Medicare Summary Notice.
  • Your name and Medicare number (as listed on your Medicare card).
  • The reason you think Medicare should not have paid.
  • Any other information you have showing why Medicare should not have paid.

Report Errors

HHS Office of Inspector General

Phone

1-800-HHS-TIPS (1-800-447-8477)

TTY: 1-800-377-4950

Internet

Report Fraud Online

Senior Medicare Patrol Program

Email

hhstips@oig.hhs.gov

Mail

HHS Tips Hotline
PO Box 23489
Washington, DC 20026-3489

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid

Phone

1-800-Medicare

1-877-486-2048

Mail

Medicare
Beneficiary Contact Center
PO Box 39
Lawrence KS, 66044

Golden Rules for Living

If you open it, close it.

If you turn it on, turn it off.

If you unlock it, lock it up.

If you break it, admit it.

If you can’t fix it, call in someone who can.

If you borrow it, return it.

If you value it, take care of it.

If you make a mess, clean it up.

If you move it, put it back.

If it belongs to someone else, get permission to use it.

If you don’t know how to operate it, leave it alone.

If it’s none of your business, don’t ask questions.

 

I Hope this will Rock and Roll You — I Believe

 

Click on here to see if you believe!

Senior Texting Abbreviations

ATD: At The Doctor’s

BFF: Best Friend Farted

BTW: Bring The Wheelchair

CBM: Covered By Medicare

CUATSC: See You At The Senior Center

DWI: Driving While Incontinent

FWB: Friend With Beta Blockers

FWIW: Forgot Where I Was

FYI: Found Your Insulin

GGPBL: Gotta Go, Pacemaker Battery Low!

GHA: Got Heartburn Again

HGBM: Had Good Bowel Movement

IMHO: Is My Hearing-Aid On?

LMDO: Laughing My Dentures Out

LOL: Living On Lipitor

LWO: Lawrence Welk’s On

OMMR: On My Massage Recliner

OMSG: Oh My! Sorry, Gas.

ROFL…CGU: Rolling On The Floor Laughing…And Can’t Get Up

SGGP: Sorry, Gotta Go Poop

TTYL: Talk To You Louder

WAITT: Who Am I Talking To?

WTFA: Wet The Furniture Again

WTP: Where are The prunes?

WWNO: Walker Wheels Need Oil

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