Tired of Sudoku? Want some ‘Square Wisdom’? Want to KenKen? Learn How Today!

 

I positively intend to slow down the progression of my Lewy Body Dementia in anyway possible. And Brain Training is one of those ways!

Do you have Alzheimer’s disease? Have vascular dementia? Another type of dementia? A caregiver? Are you a baby boomer  (a term used to describe a person who was born during the Post-World War II baby boom between 1946 and 1964). If so, then there is another brain trainer called KenKen.

It was invented by a Japanese mathematics teacher Tetsuya Miyamoto, innovator of the theory “The Art Of Teaching Without Teaching”, as an ‘instruction-free’ method of training the brain and was later published in The Times in March 2008.  

Here’s a link for some easy down to earth instructions on how to play KenKen.  

Want some free KenKen puzzles and the solutions? Go to Reader’s Digest and download them for free! I almost forgot. Here is a free KenKen calculator!

 

David

A sample KenKen problem along with the solution

Example of a KenKen Problem

                                                                     

The Answer to the KenKen Problem Shown Above
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2 Responses

  1. You can also play randomized 4×4 and 6×6 games online at http://www.webkendoku.com

    There is also a Google Gadget so that you can play games from your Google Homepage, visit http://googlemodules.com/module/8622/ to preview and add to your homepage.

  2. Your blog is an amazing resource. I am not affected by LBD, nor are friends or family members, but it is fascinating. Anything you can do to stop its advance seems so valuable

    There is something I noticed about numerals and Kenken. When doing sudoku, I generally use just dots in a mini-grid in each cell to represent the numbers. Time and time again I would mistake a 4 for a 6 and vice-versa. Simply because of their positions on the axis. But in Kenken, since the numbers have actual values, I write the digits in the grid, instead of just writing the dots. So I’ve SEEN the actual digits for four and six in their correct positions over and over.

    Now when I do sudoku, I still just use dots, but I never mistake the four for the six, or the other way around, anymore.

    Do you think this might have implications for LBD?

    Brian (a.k.a. Professor Homunculus at http://mathmojo.com/kenken )

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